Plant of the Month: Cherry Blossom Tree

There may be some debate about May’s “Plant” of the Month. It’s technically a tree - but we had such a fun time enjoying the cherry blossoms at Essex County’s Branch Brook Park, we just absolutely needed to spread the cherry blossom love. Check out some beautiful pics from our outing during the Cherry Blossom Festival, and learn a little bit more about Cherry Blossom Trees below:

 @vazquezarts

@vazquezarts

About Branch Brook Park
It’s the nation’s oldest county park and it has the largest collection of cherry blossom trees in the United States. Branch Brook Park is listed on both the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places.

Hanami
Hanami or “flower viewing” is the Japanese word for enjoying the view of flowers and is closely associated with “sakura” or cherry blossoms. When viewing cherry blossoms, peak bloom can typically last 4 days to 2 weeks and varies from year to year, depending on temperatures.

 @vazquezarts

@vazquezarts

Cherry Blossom Trees do not typically produce fruit. They have been bred for ornamental purposes only. If you’re looking for cherries, plant Prunus avium or Prunus cerasus.

Cherry Blossom Tree Care
Plant in early Spring or Fall to avoid the threat of frost. Though fairly adaptable, Cherry Blossom Trees thrive in more acidic soil. Water your tree about once a week. Make sure soil is well drained, moist, and not overly wet. Full sun, partial shade, and or mostly shady locations all work well. Though beautiful, Cherry Blossom Trees can be delicate, and prone to disease. Keep an eye out for signs of fungal infection and consult an arborist if it’s your first time planting/caring for a Cherry Blossom Tree.